Sunday, October 11, 2009

Athletic Budget Update #50


Wisconsin is considering ticket price increases in revenue sports for the first time in 2-4 years (depending on the sport). The increases will be in addition to a directive from Athletic Director Barry Alverez that all teams cut their budgets 5% for the 2010-11 fiscal year.  Administrative offices had reduced their budget for the 2009-10 fiscal year, and will be expected to do the same again for 2010-11.

Maryland has "restricted all coaches’ spending to team travel and recruiting, refrained from hiring replacements for almost a dozen administrative staffers who left for other jobs and even cut basic amenities such as water service to its Comcast Center offices" according to a recent article in Maryland's student newspaper The Diamondback

The Omaha World Herald has a review of the Big XII conference's financial situation.

Harvard student athletes are experiencing the Univeristy's budget cuts first hand with the elimination of hot breakfast.  Harvard faculty are also experiencing the crunch (or lack thereof) as well with the elimination of cookies at faculty meetings. “This is the first time in modern times with no cookies,” said Harry R. Lewis, a member of the faculty council. “We are sharing the pain with the undergraduates.”



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2 comments:

Patrick Dobel said...

It's interesting that in the rush to cut budgets, very few of the actions have been strategic. The opportunity to look carefully at the range of teams supported has been largely ignored. Across the board cuts or on the edge cuts have been the norm. It's too bad that most colleges did not use the urgency as a real change to examine serious change to their fiscal and sport structure.

halfcuban said...

The fact that a faculty member, with a straight face, can say they are "sharing the pain" by giving up cookies shows how absurd things have gotten. And it speaks to Dobel's post that most of the cost trimming has been relatively minor, and has not fully examined the serious fiscal issues facing many schools that simply do not have the student/alumni base to support their expensive athletic programs.